Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Americans Only Eat Junk Food

Living here in India I get told a lot that Americans only eat junk food and it's tiring trying to explain how that ugly rumor is crap. I have doctors tell me all the time that all we eat is junk and I hear it from others as well. Not only is it unprofessional to say that, it's absolutely not true.

Even our fast food (aka junk food) restaurants sell healthy options. All of them carry salads (not your typical plate of sliced cucumber and tomato) with anywhere from 5-10 different veggies in them. Some restaurants have as much as 60 salad options. Many carry other options as well such as baked potatoes, steamed veggies or fresh fruit. Taco Bell, one fast food giant, launched their diet friendly and vegan line up a couple years ago that has about 20 fresh and fairly healthy options. Our health is a very big issue in the US and has been for years and fast food giants are keen on looking good in the media so they jump on the chance to incorporate healthy options to attract diet conscious consumers. This doesn't mean they are good for you completely though. Most Americans don't eat out every day and when they do it's not always (or not even most of the time) at a fast food restaurant.

In our homes a lot of our food is baked. This doesn't mean all we eat is cakes like you would pick up at a bakery. We use our ovens to roast meat like Indians would in a tandoor (though the flavor is NOT the same), we also use them to grill and broil. The majority of the foods we cook in our ovens is meat and vegetables. We are very oil conscious and limit our use of oils and fats in home cooking. When we have to use fats we are taught about how to choose healthier options and we often adjust our recipes to make them healthier. We use fake butter/margarine products to keep from consuming too many fatty substances and things like that. We even have butter made from yogurt (dahi) that is quite popular.

We are taught starting early on in school how to eat a well balanced diet. Kids are taught in school how to select choices so that they get a proper amount of meat, fish, dairy products, vegetables and such. They are also taught about exercise. Yep, the media still blows out of proportion how our bodies are getting heavier and our diets are so bad. However, what they don't tell you is that Hollywood has seriously distorted our view of what a natural human body should weigh. Doctors in the US use some type of scale to determine if you're at an ideal weight. Most of these scales only figure in height, sex and age. These are a good start but by no means the best way of determining what a person should weigh. They don't take into account bone density, breast size or the difference in human bodies in general (like some people have loner arms or short torso's and longer legs) or that some people work out and build up large muscles. So our ideal body weight is based on a limited calculation of an average "normal" standard. It's not very realistic.

Years ago there was a huge issue with Selma Hayek and her weight that brought a lot of attention to this distorted view. Selma is a very shapely woman and is considered quite the sex symbol by many men. However, she was told if she wanted to continue working in Hollywood she needed to lose weight. She refused and stood up on behalf of all women. More stars followed. That has now filtered down into the modeling world as well where a couple of years ago European countries started requiring models to maintain a minimum weight. Many of them were taking extreme and unhealthy measures to try to keep up with impossible standards.

So the general consensus in the US is that you have to have bones sticking out of your skin (showing through the skin) to be considered thin and healthy. It's a sad view and it destroys the lives of many young women every day. Many international stars would be considered fat by Hollywood standards. It's sickening. And this is relatively new to America because in my mothers time Marilyn Monroe was considered sexy and women wanted to look like her but, by today's standards she would be booted out of Hollywood just like Selma Hayek. The current American standard says you have to be a size 0 to be thin and Marilyn was a size 14.

This causes a lot of bad reactions and views about the American lifestyle that are untrue. (Including the view that all Americans are fat.) Americans enjoy worldwide cuisine on a daily basis. So by thinking all we eat is junk food, you're actually thinking that food all over the world is bad and unhealthy. America is a very young nation and all of our influence (except Native American) came from other cultures. We are a "melting pot" and we have taken in every culture and integrated their foods, their clothing, their ideas and their knowledge to form our own culture. We are still creating the "American standard" out of what we draw in from every other country. So if you think all our food is bad, then yours must be too because we got it from you....or at least part of it.

31 comments:

  1. Interesting topic W.B.!.But it's not only in India(or Asia by default) where they have this notion, in Europe people think the same about American food.Media has a lot to do with it, we get told every now and then that 1 in 3 Americans is obese, etc.The only food we get from there is through junk food chains (with the exception of T.G.I Fridays and some Grills)and not "proper quality restaurants".

    Considering Europe, with the exepcion of U.K. where they eat mostly fast food(also the nation with most obese people in the old continent), people there hardly go to these places with the expection of teens and families with small kids sometimes.Our way of living revolves around the kitchen a lot(Italians would be a good example of it in the US).Food is more than eating, it's like a daily event where the whole family meets and cooks(takes a very long time because it's made from scratch!).What I saw when I visited US is that people always eat on the go and grab whatever is available, which usually is the cheapest and fastest option of "junk food".Maybe this happens only in big cities I don't know.

    Anyway, I hope I don't upset you with my words, just my experience :).

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  2. Interesting topic W.B.!.But it's not only in India(or Asia by default)
    where they have this notion, in Europe people think the same about
    American food.Media has a lot to do with it, we get told every now and
    then that 1 in 3 Americans is obese, etc.The only food we get from there
    is through junk food chains (with the exception of T.G.I Fridays and
    some Grills)and not "proper quality restaurants".

    Considering
    Europe, with the exepcion of U.K. where they eat mostly fast food(also
    the nation with most obese people in the old continent), people there
    hardly go to these places with the expection of teens and families with
    small kids sometimes.Our way of living revolves around the kitchen a
    lot(Italians would be a good example of it in the US).Food is more than
    eating, it's like a daily event where the whole family meets and
    cooks(takes a very long time because it's made from scratch!).What I saw
    when I visited US is that people always eat on the go and grab whatever
    is available, which usually is the cheapest and fastest option of "junk
    food".Maybe this happens only in big cities I don't know.

    Anyway, I hope I don't upset you with my words, just my experience :).

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  3. Please delete this last post.It got duplicated.Sorry!.

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  4. I'm not offended at all. Food on the go is common with the pressure to adhere to the clock that we have in the US. That's why I also highlighted the healthier options that many fast food joints offer. Not everyone is picking up a greasy, calorie loaded burger. Many families do try to spend time cooking and eating together at home as well. It is harder for some people, like singles and single parents but they still manage to get it done more than the media gives them credit for. And I know the media is responsible for all the bad thoughts other countries have of us. I was even considered overweight at a size 6 as a teen and when I reached adulthood I was considered morbidly obese at a size 14. (I was considered a candidate for bariatric surgery!!) So that's the ridiculous type statistics that the media goes by for that 1 in 3 they report are overweight.

    My in-laws actually eat out more than I ate out in the US which strikes me as kind of backwards according to the rumors I hear. Of course, they will deny that buying tikkis or samosas from the street vendor is eating out but I think it is. McDonalds is considered a status symbol here that is only for the rich (which I also find repulsive because I hate McDonalds lol). So people take their expensive cars and go out to McDonalds so all their friends can see. I can't help but laugh at their respect for the place when in the US we are waging health wars against it.

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  5. I really don't understand why Indians think their diet is 'healthiest'- Indians CERTAINLY aren't the 'healthiest' people in the world. Anemia, osteoporosis, heart disease, diabetes & hypertension are far more common in India than in the US. Obesity is on the rise in India too, & I don't see many Indians chowing on burgers & fries with an extra biggie jumbo super size coca cola. It would seem a diet based on 'sumo' sized portions of white rice & overcooked vegetables drenched in oil isn't very healthy either.
    I don't know what Indians think we eat in the US- my Indian family is shocked that I'm a good cook- of Indian & 'continental' cuisine. I guess they think that firangis don't have kitchens in their home?
    I'm not sure what Indian physicians have against cheese? Cheese is like a major dietary no-no according to the physicians I've met in India- but none of them can quite tell me what the reasoning is behind this. Paneer as it is made in India is mostly coagulated whey protein, one of the easiest & best digested proteins on the planet. Seems like a good idea for the majority of protein/calcium deficient vegetarians in India to me. (In moderation of course) That big pile of white rice concerns me more- straight refined carbs that digest almost exactly like white sugar. That'll put the weight on & send your blood sugar racing.
    Yes, white/Caucasian Americans of European descent do weigh more than their Indian counterparts, our skeletons are larger & denser and we also tend to carry more muscle than Indians do also.
    I'm more concerned about the 'National Shame' the the Indian PM announced yesterday of malnutrition in the children of India. I find the idea of 42% of Indian children being underweight & 59% of Indian children being permanently stunted far more disturbing than fat Americans OR fat Indians.

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  6. I know!! I saw the same news article from the PM and it's so sad. And then I see commercials advertising pouring olive oil on top of food to make it appetizing and healthier and I am just dumbfounded. Ewww! My husband also doesn't understand why I won't eat aloo parathas after his mother slathers them with 2 tablespoons of ghee. Yes, she uses that much. If that tava dries out at all she puts more on. Then he puts butter on it after it's done. That boy is a heart attack waiting to happen! I do think in general the Indian public is in denial over how many people are overweight here too. My husband had the nerve to tell me if you didn't count all the aunties who have a reason to be over weight, or the kids and non-marriageable aged women then ...and that's where I stopped him and told him if he took out over half the country it's no wonder he doesn't realize how heavy so many people are here lol. I just can't believe he thought married people had a reason to be overweight so they didn't count? WTH!

    Maybe Indians think we eat out because we don't have a maid to cook like most of them do? I know they don't realize just how much work the US woman does around the house by herself with absolutely no help. I blame TV.

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  7. trying it here too ..

    quite obviously I agree with the full " Jingle Lala " reg. junk food -- another one of those stereotypes --------- yes when I was in the U.S. 26 YEARS ago there was less health consciousness -- things have developped enormously and here too..... but way nor by our standards ! how many families eat fruits mainly during pujas ? 

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  8. Rohit always tells me they never kept fruit in the house before I came here. Now it's here all the time, mostly just for me but they have started eating more too. I've taught them some new salad ideas and also have taught them how to cook some foods with less oil and ghee. I'm introducing them to new flavors. It's a long slow process though.

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  9. I would love to know more about salad ideas. I hate vegetables that are cooked beyond lightly steamed. When we move there I doubt I can subsist solely on cucumber and tomato 'salad'.

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  10. Um.. McDonald.. as status symbol.. oh PUH-LEASE.. !!!!
    McDonalds is for cheapsters and college/school students.
    No self respecting professional guy would dare take her gf to a McD on a date. 
    Where else you will get 8 rs cone, 20 rs burger.. :D
    Pizza hut and Dominos diners are a different thing altogether.

    And.. I think.. its not just a notion that US has a lot of obese people.
    Its a reality of our times. When I was in Korea, I met a lot of Canadian and American English teachers who all complained how their students call them fat pig in Korean.. behind their backs.

    All of them used to search in vain for XXXL sizes in Korea. In the end they had to order those sizes from US itself.

    Its not all bone density, its a LOT OF FAT. :) ..I guess,  most of it is coz of the amount of BEER they gulp.

    And I dont think.. Indians consider ALL of their food as healthy.
    Mothers give parantha as kind of treat to kids. In most of homes, paranthas are winter  breakfast. 

    In South/East India, They dont even know what is a parantha :)

    India is a continent .. You shouldnt generalize.
    If you need to make a comparison, compare your neighbourhood with US not the whole of India.

    Do you really think you know the eating habits of ppl in J&K or in Kerala or in lets say Benaras ??

    A lot of people pointed this out to you earlier as well.. but you dont seem to bother with it. Until you broaden your perspective, you wont grow as a writer or a person, and you will remain a narrow minded, grumpy american stuck against her will in India.

    Check out William Dalrymple's books, Check out eatanddust.. when these authors make a comment, ppl understand and dont take offence. Try to find out why is it so.

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  11. Actually my exact word was "here." I never said India. I'm not the one making generalizations, you are the one insinuating that I meant all of India. I find it interesting how you tell me not to generalize yet you made several generalizations in you comments. Also, you should know that Asian sizes are well known to be different from the rest of the world so a XXXL here or in Korea is not the same as a XXXL in the rest of the world. And wake up, India also has a significant problem with overweight people. Just read the news, even the PM is calling attention to it. And that's not my generalization, that's a fact your own country recognizes.

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  12. Obesity effects 5% of India's population.  Malnutrition affects over 47%.  

    While obesity is very high in the US, this is mainly due to "fast food" or on the go food and an unhealthy life style (ie: work/life imbalance).  

    Obesity in India due to a multitude of factors, fast food being lowest on the list.  The daily amount of fried foods and sweets that are consumed here as a daily and normal "family" meal are the main contributor's to obesity, cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes.  

    I know for my personal experience in the US, we ate far more grilled, broiled, roasted and steamed veggies then is ever seen here in India.  Bread and rice are occasionally eaten items and not a part of each meal.  If I were to go out to a resto here, I would be VERY hard pressed to find a healthy meal by my own standards (steamed veggies, salad, whole wheat/bran bread, etc).  

    I really think it's you who needs to have a broader understanding.  Perhaps you may have traveled but you certainly didn't spend much time actually learning more from outside what you witnessed.  

    Not everyone in the US is obese and people who are obese will be so for differing reasons then another country.  

    Comparing/contrasting the two is not always an easy task.  

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  13. Um. .. so.... you are clarifying that you are actually talking about your small neighborhood in Amritsar and you are NOT talking about India. Thats ok with me :)


    My response was to show you how you feel about generalization when you urself use it so very often.

    And You ASSUMING I dont know about the size variation in different countries. I said.. those teachers were looking for XXXL sizes .. which they COULDNT FIND in Korea. What do you think it means ??? 

    Every country is facing the same problem of obesity  .. so how does it even matter.  When did I ever deny that there are not many obese here.

    If you are looking strictly by political boundaries, yeah sure india is a country. 

    But if you actually try to understand India, you will know what I meant when I said, that india is a continent. A multitude of culture and religion.

    As you move from one state to another, there is a sea change in attire, food, language, etc. etc.. but I guess, you are too busy in your cocoon to notice all this.

    I am a little sad the way your life and this blog is evolving here. You had so much potential. But its again degenerating into an "america is great, India is shit" kinda blog. Maybe its a conscious decision maybe its happening sub consciously.

    BTW, I gave you two nice directions .. did you check out those books and blog ?

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  14. I'd categorize anything that isn't fruit and vegetable as junk food.

    I don't think you can get obese with samosas and vada pavs. They are just potatoes and peas which won't make anyone fat. It it indeed made people fat then the homeless people and the beggars would have gotten fatter than the wealthy kids because indian street food is all they eat.

    Indian street food is unhealthy if you eat it all the time but it definitely is not the cause of obesity. The real reason why some indians are obese is because they do not exercise or take a little walk after meals. They will just sit in front of the TV eating their food and continue sitting there for another few hours even after they have completed their meals. Any indian who engages in daily chores will automatically be drained. The point is to walk after every meal and lunch.

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  15. Yup I got some Drs here in India who simply said matter of factly "You foreigners only eat junk food" sigh! And I had other common people say "Pasta is Junk food" it's as junky as rice since we are talking starch here, and it is what goes on top of rice and past a that can turn it into a downright disaster. So an occasional regular serving of rice OR pasta with a healthy home made tomato sauce or a choice of veggies is always better than a serving of rice OR pasta loaded with creamy white sauce or topped with a laddle of ghee!
    One thing that is extremly disturbing in India is the amount of carbs on one's plate, the servings of rice in South India are giagantic, chapati while still made with atta are still carbs, and dal while a great source of protein it also contains a fair amount of carbs. it is a diet that is appropriate for a fild worker because it gives one a lot of energy, but it is certainly not adapted to your modern urban dweller.
    I have PCOS and associated with it insulin resistance, here is the first thing my indian endocrinologist said: skip the rice on most day, never eat more than 2 chapati, keep your serving of dal to one small bowl, don't be cheap when it comes to veggies, and top your meals with a salad if you eat Indian. In the continental fare stick with mediteranean type diet.
    The dieteticial accross the hall had a huge poster on her door listing what a healthy Indian diet should be like: 2 chapati max, keep rice to small portions or skip it all together, no ghee, no overcooked vegetables, paneer eaten raw or cooked at least once a day, more salads on the plate, fresh fruits at the end of the meal or as a snack.

    the medical corp is starting to hype up their game in getting India healthier, it is afterall the world's diabetes capital, and you can't exactly blame it on international fast food joints, as a very small percentage of the population visit these.

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  16. Did I ever mention about the eating habits of US or any other country... ???

    You are again ASSUMING that I dont know about kind of food available in the restaurants in US. which is totally uncalled for.

    I was just commenting on how narrow the viewpoint of the author of this blog is.

    And again you are also making the same mistake of comparing whichever little neighborhood of india you are staying in to US. 

    India is not a  homogenized country like US. The cuisine differ from state to state. Even the wheat and Rice variety differs from state to state. Do you even know which part of india eats fried food and which part doesn't ??

    Its like.. you just had some cliches in mind.. and you keep applying it without thinking about how you are generalizing the whole thing.

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  17. Good points. .. Thats one balanced POV that I have read on this blog post.

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  18. I blog about the India I see. You're right, I don't travel much because I see more here than I care to see and I'm not interested in more of the same just because there are a few more trees here and there or a different pattern on the sari's. Denial doesn't fix problems and even the government recognizes many of the problems I've blogged about as being country wide issues. My view is my view. It's what I see, what I experience. I couldn't possibly blog from some one elses point of view and it would defeat the purpose of a personal blog anyway. The whole point in this blog is to highlight MY journey, MY thoughts, MY feelings. So I wouldn't be doing justice to it if I only posted that India is so fabulous, so wonderful and I love every aspect of it. If you don't like my view of India then do something to change the way Indians treat this country and the people in it. Then I will have a different view. Yes, I'm tired of seeing Indians treat this country like shit and then say how wonderful it is. If it's wonderful, treat it as such. If they treat it better in other states then that is great (which I've also talked about here and praised those that do). I have yet to see it though and I'm not going to deny the things I see here.

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  19. Fruits and veggies can be made into junk food as well sadly. But you're right, eating just the veggies isn't bad at all, especially fresh and not cooked until they are mushy. That's when they have the most nutritious qualities. Adding oil to fry them or ghee makes them unhealthy. Wrapping them in any type of dough (bread or pastry) and then frying makes them significantly unhealthy. Eating in front of the TV is very bad! Studies in the US have proven time and time again that you will eat more while sitting there and won't recognize your body's own response to being satiated or full from the food and will just keep putting more in your mouth. The TV also promotes junkier eating habits - making you crave higher fat foods or snack type foods as well.

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  20. Everything needs to be taken in moderation. I love making my own fresh tomato sauce but I don't limit it to just pasta. I think I need to look for a copy of that poster online. It sounds quite helpful in diet planning here. Right now I'm eating about 85% raw fruits and veggies. I avoid most flatbreads because I just think they are bland and unnecessary. Not to mention that the food stains my fingers so bad. Right now even a nail brush isn't turning the edges of my fingernails white anymore and that bothers me. It's really a detriment to be as pale as I am here because I can't stay clean looking no matter how much I scrub my skin with the nail brush. The sugar and starch lifestyle scares me and bothers me. Mostly because I'm tired of potatoes so frequently but also because I have already lost most of my muscle living this lifestyle and with my thyroid disorder I'm much more likely to get diabetes so I have to be vigilant.

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  21. Argue all you want Naren but there are literally hundreds of foreigners living here in India seeing the same things no matter what area they live in. They can't all be wrong. And while they are respecting your view as an Indian who was born and raised under very different conditions, you are not respecting any of theirs. No matter what you say the fact still remains that each of us has DIFFERENT experiences and perceptions based on where we came from, where we live here and what we see. It happens to individuals who move to a different country no matter where they are from or where they go. Each of us has our own rights to think and feel as we see fit based on our unique circumstances. You're certainly entitled to disagree but that doesn't make you instantly right or the authority. It makes it YOUR view based on YOUR experiences in YOUR life. Not everyone esles.

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  22. Sorry Naren, but you did mention the US and that they are fat because of all the Beer they gulp.

    And I live in a little neighborhood of a much larger city than Amritsar with more opportunities to roam.  So who's making the assumptions now?  ;)    Also, you misunderstand my meaning of "fried foods".  To me, fried means anything that has oil that has been heated in order to fry either spice or base product.  Most curries, no matter where you are in India start with oil being heated to fry spice, onion and the like (with the exceptions of the places I listed below).  All regions of India have their own version of flat bread, some of which is healthier but most of which is either shallow fried in oil or ghee (bad) or deep fried in the same (worse). All regions of India have their own version of sweets made with larger amounts of sugar and cream.Most (not all) regions of India include rice in their daily diet.  With the except of long brown rice which is rarer here in India, white rice is high in starch and high in glycemic index.  With the exceptions of Andaman, Jharkhand and Manipur (perhaps a few others that I am forgetting), the amount of oil used in the daily Indian household is far more than is used in US (the only other country in which I'm familiar in cooking techniques).  My comment was meant to show that someone coming from a western country might find these ways of cooking excessive in comparison to what they've generally been raised with.  Also, I never said you do not know what western restaurants offer.  I said you do not know what the daily meal served in a western HOME constitutes.  In the US, there is either the unhealthy fast food which most people consume at least 3-4 times a week either for breakfast, lunch or dinner and there are the restaurants that are a bit healthier that most people go to for special occasions or perhaps 1-2 times a month.  Each time, you will find foods that people normally do not prepare at home due to time constraints, technical difficulty or cost issues. It's been my observation that throughout India, more people eat out daily because the food that they can purchase out is similar or exact to what they would prepare at home with similar (or less) cost and less toil on their part.  Anyway..... Here's your own comment:"And.. I think.. its not just a notion that US has a lot of obese people.Its a reality of our times. When I was in Korea, I met a lot of Canadian and American English teachers who all complained how their students call them fat pig in Korean.. behind their backs.All of them used to search in vain for XXXL sizes in Korea. In the end they had to order those sizes from US itself.Its not all bone density, its a LOT OF FAT. :) ..I guess,  most of it is coz of the amount of BEER they gulp."

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  23. For some strange reason, I am unable to reply to your post below so am replying here.

    gorirajkumari Most of the comments you have made in the post below.. shows how little information/knowledge you have of Indian cuisine.. (If there is such thing).

    I have so far eaten.. 5 different varieties of rice in different states in India, which includes : White(Basmati, small), Brown, Red, Yellow.

    In most of south India, including the multicultural Bangalore, Chapati/wheat is a luxury which is only made during festivals and  parties, forget about frying them.
    In eastern part of India, only a minority may have heard about chapati.
    In Uttaranchal/Himanchal, chapati is only fried during festivals/occasion.

    In most of UP, Bihar, Rice is eaten only on weekends.
    Chapati is common without frying.
    In Gujarat, forget about spices, they make their dishes with sugar syrups, In Calcutta they will make you 50 different dishes out of banana tree alone.

    And your observation that indians eat out because food is similar is hilarious coz no avg. indian cooks tandoori/butter chicken at home. Even the simple dal fry eaten outside is nowhere close to home variety.

    And even if your city is larger than amritsar.. you just cant generalize india. As you see from your observation you only know the tip of the iceberg.

    White Bhabi 
    First of all.. the experiences you are having are unique. I have met hundreds of foreigners staying in india for variable period of time, who are enjoying their time here and never bothered about the kind of issues you have started to post.

    If you refuse to take the criticism you will refuse to grow.

     I don't travel much because I see more here than I care to see and I'm not interested in more of the same just because there are a few more trees here and there or a different pattern on the sari's 

    If this is your attitude then I am sorry but you will remain a grumpy white girl stuck up in India. Not the author who earns the respect of others coz of her research and observation. 

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  24. Sorry, I wouldn't consider potatoes as a vegetable.
    Yes, you can get fat on potatoes as they are primarily starch/carbohydrates with very little other nutritional value. Put them in a greasy fried wheat dough encased samosa or fry them in oil & put them on bread (vada pav) & you have a grease & carbohydrate bomb that is a diabetics' nightmare.

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  25. Naren Mehra-
    Why all this hostility towards fat people?
    Did a fat person ever do anything to you?
    Look who is generalizing Americans as 'fat pigs'?
    So Koreans call Americans 'fat pigs' do you want to know what Koreans call Indians? (I'll bet you won't like it)
    Is being fat shameful?
    I'm just curious, I find the fact that 42% of Indian children are underweight & the fact that 59% of Indian children are PERMANENTLY physically & mentally stunted due to malnutrition SHAMEFUL.
    I'll take an entire nation of 'fatties' over that any day.
    Learn some manners, being RUDE to people with 'health' issues (like obesity) is NOT acceptable.

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  26. Disqus is set to automatically limit the number of replies to a comment for display purposes. The lines get too short to be viewed almost so it stops the comments.

    As for the foreigners you met, once again they are not me and will not have my life nor experiences. And just because they didn't complain to you doesn't mean they didn't have some of the same thoughts I have had. There is no way for anyone to know what was in their minds and it's wrong to assume so.

    I see your criticism. You basically said that this can't be right because you've never seen and experienced it. Which doesn't make it so. Even you have not seen all of India and as I've already said I can respect your experiences are not mine and will not be the same. And no, I will not remain stuck up in India. I am avidly working on my exit because I have seen more than I want to see and been subjected to far more sadistic behavior than I care to deal with. And just because my research and experiences don't fit your ideal of India to a tee doesn't mean it isn't still useful to countless others.

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  27. A word of warning to all of you who care to 'healthfully' indulge in raw fruits/vegetables-
    If you can't peel what you wish to eat 'raw' be sure to wash it well with soap & 'clean' water.
    Due to India's lack of sanitation-hookworms, amoebiasis, whipworms, typhoid & other 'fecally' transmitted parasites & bacteria are endemic.
    Think twice about that sprinkle of raw cilantro leaves atop your entree- raw cilantro is usually contaminated with hookworm cysts. Fecal material is notoriously 'sticky' 7 difficult to get off leafy vegetables.

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  28. Yeah, potatoes are not a veggie by international standards. Tomatoes are not as well, they are a fruit due to their sugar content. I avoid oil like the plague, especially since I know I was having reactions to it when I first came. Once I stopped eating it, I stopped getting weekly stomach infections.

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  29. I need a "like" button. Very good advice! I would like to add that you should NEVER eat raw foods and veggies that you didn't personally wash/peel yourself if you are foreigner coming to India. You don't have the immunity for it and no iron stomach is going to protect you.

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  30. Bibi, spare me your theorotical mumbo jumbo cause they are inconsistent in practical evidence and I know you spew a lot of this sh!t all over the internet to numb peoples brains out.

    Look around... Look the fack around for a sec. Look at what indians are eating and look at what americans are eating. Vada pavs(potato bread patty) is the largest  past time food for many indians. That's indias national street food. It's what the beggars of this country live on. Why are these indian beggers not becoming fat? Why are the americans getting fat? What the fack are they eating? huh?

    You've used too many adjectives and nouns to make your point and now I cannot take you seriously.

    *primarily starch/carbohydrates
    *nutritional value
    *greasy fried wheat dough encased samosa
    *carbohydrate bomb
    *diabetics' nightmare.  

    I bet you drop these semantic bombs every chance you get. And for what? Tackle a few indians for whom the english language is not native? lol.

    Why don't you try playing with this particular indian and see if i can put you in your place.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Bibi, spare me your theorotical mumbo jumbo cause they are inconsistent in practical evidence and I know you spew a lot of this sh!t all over the internet to numb peoples brains out.

    Look around... Look the fack around for a sec. Look at what indians are eating and look at what americans are eating. Vada pavs(potato bread patty) is the largest  past time food for many indians. That's indias national street food. It's what the beggars of this country live on. Why are these indian beggers not becoming fat? Why are the americans getting fat? What the fack are they eating? huh?

    You've used too many adjectives and nouns to make your point and now I cannot take you seriously.

    *primarily starch/carbohydrates
    *nutritional value
    *greasy fried wheat dough encased samosa
    *carbohydrate bomb
    *diabetics' nightmare.  

    I bet you drop these semantic bombs every chance you get. And for what? Tackle a few indians for whom the english language is not native? lol.

    Why don't you try playing with this particular indian and see if i can put you in your place.

    ReplyDelete